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Local jurisdictions lowered or held flat property tax rates for 2022 — what does that mean for you bill?

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HousingForAll

A home in northwest Olathe near College Boulevard.

The local jurisdictions that decide the tax rates for Olathe residents either lowered or kept their property tax mill levies flat for the next fiscal year. That means the local tax rate — collected by the city, county and school district — is going down, but that probably doesn’t mean your bill will. 

In fact, for most people, your overall bill will go up about 5 percent, thanks to increasing home valuations in Olathe. The average value of residential property in Olathe increased in the past year by 5.5 percent, according to data published by the county property appraiser.

FOR RESIDENTS IN THE OLATHE SCHOOL DISTRICT BOUNDARY 

For the Olathe school district, the adopted mill levy rate of 68.108 is down 1.03 mills from the adopted mill levy rate for fiscal year 2021 of 69.138. It’s also the lowest mill levy rate since 2017 when the property tax rate was more than 70 mills as the school district opened several school buildings. 

Continuing on a trend stretching back more than 20 years, the Olathe City Council opted to keep the mill levy rate below 25 mills. The city’s property tax rate will remain at 24.44 mills for 2022. 

USD233PropertyTax2022DueComp

For Johnson County as a whole, the adopted mill levy is about 25.497, down from 25.78 last year. That figure includes the mill levy rate for the general fund, the county’s parks and recreation fund and the county’s library fund. In Olathe, the city maintains its own library and parks funds, the latter of which is supported largely by a sales tax. 

That brings the overall local property tax rate for Olathe residents to about 118 mills, down more than one mill from last year. Even then, the tax bill for a $100,000 home would be roughly $1,275, which is an increase of about $61 or 5.08%. 

USD233PropertyTax2022PI

The final tax bill residents will eventually have to pay will include rates from other jurisdictions beyond the three outlined above, including from the state. 

FOR RESIDENTS IN THE SPRING HILL SCHOOL DISTRICT BOUNDARY 

For the Spring Hill school district, which covers the southern tip of Olathe, the adopted mill levy rate of 67.72 is down about .1 mills from the adopted mill levy rate for fiscal year 2021 67.83. Looking toward the future, the district’s director of business and finance Doug Schwinn said USD 230 might have to increase its mill levy during the next budget review cycle.

Continuing a trend stretching back more than 20 years, the Olathe City Council opted to keep the mill levy rate below 25 mills. The city’s property tax rate will remain at 24.44 mills for 2022. 

USD230PropertyTax2022DueComp

For Johnson County as a whole, the adopted mill levy is about 25.497, down from 25.78 last year. That figure includes the mill levy rate for the general fund, the county’s parks and recreation fund and the county’s library fund. In Olathe, the city maintains its own library and parks funds, the latter of which is supported largely by a sales tax. 

That brings the overall local property tax rate for Olathe residents in the Spring Hill school district’s attendance area to 117.6 mills, down just shy of a mill from last year. Even then, the tax bill for a $100,000 home would be roughly $1,271, which is an increase of about $70 or 5.81%. 

USD230PropertyTax2022PI

The final tax bill residents will eventually have to pay will include rates from other jurisdictions beyond the three outlined above, including from the state.

The new rates take effect Jan. 1.  

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